The 5 Most Crucial Steps for Becoming a Morning Person

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We know that developing a positive morning routine can greatly impact our mental and emotional well-being, increase our productivity levels and improve our quality of life. But we also know it’s a lot easier said than done, right?

As a former late sleeper turned morning person, I’ve compiled what I believe to be 5 of the most crucial steps for breaking up with the snooze button.

  1. Determine your motivation. If you don’t have a really strong reason for wanting to take your mornings back other than that you’ve been told it’s a good idea, you probably won’t fully commit. You need to determine HOW reclaiming your mornings will impact your life and WHY that is important to you. If you don’t have really strong reasons for waking up earlier, the rest of these steps won’t matter, so it’s important to get crystal clear about your goals and how an earlier wake-up time will help you achieve them.
  2. Throw out your current narrative. Proclaiming that you just “aren’t a morning person” isn’t exactly opening up the space for you to become one, is it? Focusing on how much you hate mornings probably won’t help you in the process of learning how to enjoy them. Shift your mindset and visualize yourself enjoying your mornings every night before you go to bed. Focus on the aspects of morning that you enjoy rather than what you dread about them. When you wake up, replace complaints with gratitude and set positive and productive intentions for the day.
  3. Develop a routine. We are creatures of habit, so developing a morning routine will make you more likely to be successful in your mission to wake up earlier. As you consistently do this routine, waking up earlier will feel like less of a chore and more of a normality (typically after the first month). Develop your routine by choosing tasks that are directly connected to your motivation and that will directly impact the reasons you’re deciding to make mornings a priority.
  4. Sprinkle in things that you enjoy. Start by thinking about the things you love to do, but find yourself not having the time or energy for later in the day — exercise, reading, journaling and meditation are common morning practices that help people feel more fulfilled and productive throughout the day. Think about what things might make you feel that way and schedule them into your routine accordingly. Without some form of enjoyment in your morning routine, chances are you’ll feel more inclined to skip it.
  5. Commit. One of the biggest reasons people fail to develop a new routine or habit is because they don’t ever fully mentally commit to it. They see it as optional, something they would like to do, instead of a requirement and something that they have to do to achieve their goals. This is often a defense mechanism we use to cope with our fear of failure. Try, instead, to think of your morning routine as a non-negotiable part of your day. If you do miss it, don’t let that be a perceived failure or an excuse to give up entirely. Instead, make a re-commitment to your morning routine every day with your WHY at the forefront of your mind.

You may often hear about behavioral techniques you can use to trick yourself into getting up earlier — putting your alarm clock across the room, splashing water on your face, jumping into a cold shower, sleeping in your workout clothes, getting to bed earlier — many of which are incredibly helpful and effective. But these things alone won’t get you out of bed earlier every day. You must have a strong desire and motivation, something that excites you and a routine and mindset that will help you stay committed.

Whether you love or hate mornings, I’d love to hear from you. What things help you to have or prevent you from having a productive morning? Which of these 5 steps, if any, do you need to implement most in your quest to reclaim your mornings?